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Darian Miller

2022 StackOverflow dev survey - salary results

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Delphi has the longest "Average years of professional experience" but a horrifc Median salary.  

 

In the U.S. you should be getting at least $100k as a Delphi developer with more than two years experience.  $120k should be negotiated for an experienced Delphi developer (although I have recently seen people trying to get away with hiring Delphi devs at $60k in the U.S. which is why they cannot find anyone to fill the positions.)

 

image.thumb.png.60a379fb9d6e18488cbde79b1dd11701.png

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49 minutes ago, Darian Miller said:

Delphi has the longest "Average years of professional experience" but a horrifc Median salary.  

...and PowerShell pays 15% better than C, C++ and C#... Yeah, right :classic_dry:

 

- but then again, you'd have to throw really big bucks at me to get me to touch that crap.

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Posted (edited)

Hm, that's the median salary not the arithmetic average. Not sure what the effect of that would be. Usually I tend to see the median to be the better figure for comparison.

 

Edit: Salaries also vary greatly depending on the country and the tax/benefits. E.g. a salary of 60000 Euros in Germany means that on top of that the employer mandatorily pays half of several social security contributions (that's health insurance, pension, unemployment insurance, care insurance) which amounts to roughly 10%  extra (60000 Euros -> become about 66000) so when you compare that to say 60000 US$ you not only have to consider the current exchange rate but also these factors. In the US most "benefits" are not mandatory, no idea if they are part of the salary somebody will fill into such a questionnaire.

Edited by dummzeuch

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12 hours ago, Darian Miller said:

In the U.S. you should be getting at least $100k as a Delphi developer with more than two years experience.  $120k should be negotiated for an experienced Delphi developer (although I have recently seen people trying to get away with hiring Delphi devs at $60k in the U.S. which is why they cannot find anyone to fill the positions.)

So as a very experienced Delphi developer I should be getting $200k? Plz hire me 😄

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13 hours ago, Darian Miller said:

In the U.S. you should be getting at least $100k as a Delphi developer with more than two years experience

I have 25+ years Delphi experience programming professionally. What does that work out to? 😉

 

Total years does not necessarily mean "I'm better than someone with less". Results speak louder than years.

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14 minutes ago, Dave Nottage said:

I have 25+ years Delphi experience programming professionally. What does that work out to? 😉

 

Unemployably expensive? 🤪

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1 hour ago, dummzeuch said:

Hm, that's the median salary not the arithmetic average. Not sure what the effect of that would be. Usually I tend to see the median to be the better figure for comparison.

 

Edit: Salaries also vary greatly depending on the country and the tax/benefits. E.g. a salary of 60000 Euros in Germany means that on top of that the employer mandatorily pays half of several social security contributions (that's health insurance, pension, unemployment insurance, care insurance) which amounts to roughly 10%  extra (60000 Euros -> become about 66000) so when you compare that to say 60000 US$ you not only have to consider the current exchange rate but also these factors. In the US most "benefits" are not mandatory, no idea if they are part of the salary somebody will fill into such a questionnaire.

1. I totally agree. In addition, in Germany "13" salary is often paid. The question is whether this was properly taken into account. Only 12 months are used in the methodology.
2. It would be interesting to know which countries the developers interviewed. And also what the numbers look like by region (e.g. Asia, Europe, etc.). E.g. in USA the developer gets 80000 USD a year and in  Kyrgyzstan only 10000. "The valuess indicate the average fever values of patients in the hospital". 

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Please don't forget India... there is a (mostly monetary) reason why management considers outsourcing a good idea.

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1 hour ago, Sherlock said:

Please don't forget India

Oh, yes! There is Big Indian and Little Indian format, eh? :classic_wink:

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5 hours ago, Uwe Raabe said:

Oh, yes! There is Big Indian and Little Indian format, eh? :classic_wink:

One of my former coworkers started to call herself the Little Indian (she was of Indian descend and really tiny) after she heard one of the developers talking about little endian vs. big endian format. Somehow it didn't get old, we had a laugh every time she said that (the reason possibly was that we were drunk most of the time, playing Total Annihilation after office hours) Those were the days ...

Edited by dummzeuch
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Posted (edited)

so, i can earn around 15000 more when i dust this thing of and start reading it again 🙂 :

(take it to work tomorrow, put it on my desk;) ).

 

 

image.png.371ae9817d1b2bfddfc2c6ee65dfaac3.png

Edited by mvanrijnen

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1 hour ago, mvanrijnen said:

so, i can earn around 15000 more when i dust this thing of and start reading it again 🙂 :

(take it to work tomorrow, put it on my desk;) ).

Taking it to work and having it lying around on your desk for a while might actually help when the time comes to renegotiate your salary.

 

On the other hand, I have had some first hand experience with COBOL and I am sure that 15000 (US$?) is not worth the pain. My memory of COBOL is even worse than Visual Basic (the original one, not VB.NET, I don't know the latter).

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It is probably associated with the fact that they have a lot of software in the USA in COBOL. There are few people who control it. They are forced to update this software.

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i'v had one year Cobol (like 20years ago), wrote my own mousehandling and menusystem for it (was not available in the standard cobol we had at class then). 

what i remember, programming Cobol is like writing a book, COMPUTE blalblblbl GIVING etc etc, sections, columns pff. 

(we did the programming exams with pen and paper then, imagine)

 

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On 6/22/2022 at 2:49 PM, Darian Miller said:

In the U.S. you should be getting at least $100k as a Delphi developer with more than two years experience.  $120k should be negotiated for an experienced Delphi developer (although I have recently seen people trying to get away with hiring Delphi devs at $60k in the U.S. which is why they cannot find anyone to fill the positions.)

That's very common in US, it's a big country and you can't expect Silicon Valley to have same salaries as some other states. And in this Covid era, I see $60K to be acceptable offer for beginners positions, or a part-time job, if full remote.

 

On 6/23/2022 at 5:26 AM, PaPaNi said:

in Germany "13" salary is often paid. The question is whether this was properly taken into account. Only 12 months are used in the methodology.

Unlikely the bonuses are included in reported as a yearly salary, since it varies from year to year and also usually you don't know you get it until you actually do. I'm sure you probably know Austria has quite common the 13th and 14th month bonus (and 15th! in rare cases).

Such bonuses are quite common in European companies doing well. In US, when companies are doing well, you get free coffee and donuts and team building days.

 

 

A 35% increase in salary in 1 year... yeah right 🙂

image.thumb.png.721afc00461aa531489b27789c4d74ee.png

 

 

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54 minutes ago, Mike Torrettinni said:

Unlikely the bonuses are included in reported as a yearly salary, since it varies from year to year and also usually you don't know you get it until you actually do.

The 13th (or even 14th in banks) monthly salary in Germany is no bonus, It is part of the regular salary and cannot be withheld if business is slow. It is usually paid with the November salary.

 

It is kind of a tradition here. Personally I think that is kind of stupid. There isn't really any advantage in getting paid the yearly salary in 13 parts rather than 12, but apparently many people don't understand that and insist on it.

 

Of course there are also contracts which specifically specify as a bonus (sometimes on top of the 13 monthly salaries), which in that case isn't considered a "13th monthly salary" but (guess what?) a bonus.

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35 minutes ago, dummzeuch said:

The 13th (or even 14th in banks) monthly salary in Germany is no bonus, It is part of the regular salary and cannot be withheld if business is slow. It is usually paid with the November salary.

 

It is kind of a tradition here. Personally I think that is kind of stupid. There isn't really any advantage in getting paid the yearly salary in 13 parts rather than 12, but apparently many people don't understand that and insist on it.

 

Of course there are also contracts which specifically specify as a bonus (sometimes on top of the 13 monthly salaries), which in that case isn't considered a "13th monthly salary" but (guess what?) a bonus.

Interesting. I know for a few eastern European countries do have these 13th+ salaries as bonuses, if company does well. I guess the more west you go, the less bonus is really a bonus. I know UK doesn't have 13th month pay.

 

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1 minute ago, Mike Torrettinni said:

I know for a few eastern European countries do have these 13th+ salaries as bonuses,

No, it's pension and usually given before the elections.

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