Jump to content
PeterPanettone

Delphi compatibility with Windows 11?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Define compatibility... Delphi applications work, IDE works... MS has good track record in providing backward compatibility for existing applications. Minor tweaking to embrace new OS features are always possible.

 

You can find more information here: https://blogs.embarcadero.com/windows-11-a-beautiful-meteor-will-wipe-out-the-dinosaurs/

Edited by Dalija Prasnikar
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
8 minutes ago, Dalija Prasnikar said:

"If your PC doesn’t have a TPM capability then Windows 11 will be the falling rock which wipes out your beloved dinosaur hardware. "

- May be linux installed on metal, created virtual machine using libvirtd + QEMU and virtualised TPM? 🙂

Share this post


Link to post

It was MS who disabled using TPM for Home versions of W10 now its mandatory from 11? 😉 muha

Share this post


Link to post
11 minutes ago, PeterPanettone said:

I wonder whether ROUNDED CORNERS will be compatible with the Delphi IDE. 😊

Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7 had round corners... I guess that will not be an issue 😃

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Being able to run Android apps natively in Windows 11 (WSA: Windows Subsystem for Android) will be also a boost for mobile development in Delphi. That will make it possible to test Delphi Android apps directly in Windows without the hassle of a separate Android test environment.

Edited by PeterPanettone

Share this post


Link to post

It is possible to patch the Windows 11 installer to skip the TPM check. 

 

Has anyone tried Windows Server 2022 yet, does it also require a TPM?  Presumably based on W11 rather than W10.

 

Angus

 

Share this post


Link to post

There is still a lot of FUD about Windows 11 requirements.  Seems that MS is revisiting some "older" (2017/2018) CPUs to see if they can be used, so it is not just about TPM, but also about drawing a line in the sand with regard to minimum CPU instruction set requirements.

https://www.theverge.com/2021/6/28/22554245/microsoft-windows-11-cpu-intel-7th-gen-amd-zen-1-pc

Share this post


Link to post

I run the Windows 11 check on my computer (Windows 10 VM on a new modern MacBook Pro with 64 GB RAM and 2.4 GHz 8-Core i9 and AMD Radeon Pro 5500M 8 GB Intel UHD Graphics 630 1536 MB) and it said: NOT compatible with Windows 11.

Share this post


Link to post
15 minutes ago, Uwe Raabe said:

UEFI BIOS

I wonder how hard it will be to turn on UEFI on a laptop.

Share this post


Link to post

To check your current TPM status, Win+R and start tpm.msc

To check your UEFI status, Win+R and start msinfo32.exe - look at BIOS mode

 

There seems to be some loopholes with regards to TPM, but too early to be definitive about it.

 

Edit: It seems that some BIOS firmware based solutions are accepted?
https://www.windowscentral.com/best-trusted-platform-modules-tpm

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post

A UEFI BIOS is something you have, or an old fashioned BIOS.  TPM is hardware, but sometimes needs to be enabled in the BIOS.

 

I built a new PC six months ago, had an Asus MB choice between five SATA ports and a TPM slot, or six SATA ports, but I needed all six for a lot of flash and spinning rust, with RAID.

 

Unfortunately, TPMs do not seem to come on PCIe cards, only special slots. had one in my old PC.

 

Angus

 

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Vandrovnik said:

"If your PC doesn’t have a TPM capability then Windows 11 will be the falling rock which wipes out your beloved dinosaur hardware. "

- May be linux installed on metal, created virtual machine using libvirtd + QEMU and virtualised TPM? 🙂

I wonder what that means for VmWare (Fusion/Workstation) Win11 guests

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Fusion/11/com.vmware.fusion.using.doc/GUID-4EC58A68-BE9E-42F6-B005-4BB63AE5D85B.html

 

Do we now have to encrypt all guests, and cannot move them around easily ?

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Lars Fosdal said:

There is still a lot of FUD about Windows 11 requirements. 

And some folks are no doubt less than amused to find that they bought an MS Surface in the last two years that is reportedly not compatible.

 

I haven't seen anything compelling yet, and have seen a number of things which I find undesirable.

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Angus Robertson said:

A UEFI BIOS is something you have, or an old fashioned BIOS.

You can still have the first, but nevertheless the second being active. Usually an UEFI BIOS can be made working as an old fashioned one. Unfortunately switching that back to UEFI mode requires some significant work to make Windows boot again.

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Lars Fosdal said:

To check your current TPM status, Win+R and start tpm.msc

To check your UEFI status, Win+R and start msinfo32.exe - look at BIOS mode

 

There seems to be some loopholes with regards to TPM, but too early to be definitive about it.

 

Edit: It seems that some BIOS firmware based solutions are accepted?
https://www.windowscentral.com/best-trusted-platform-modules-tpm

Does that list the TPM Version?
My PC at home doesn't have TPM available, I can't check.

My PC at work does and I used PowerShell with WMI to get the version

foreach($instance in Get-WmiObject -Namespace Root\CIMV2\Security\MicrosoftTpm -Class Win32_Tpm)
{
    $instance | Select-Object -Property * | Format-List
}

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/secprov/win32-tpm

https://trustedcomputinggroup.org/resource/tpm-library-specification/

Share this post


Link to post
Quote

I used PowerShell with WMI to get the version 

Or use Computer Management, Device Manager, Security devices, and it should say Trusted Platform Module 2.0 with a very old driver. 

 

Angus

 

Share this post


Link to post
10 hours ago, Martin Wienold said:

Does that list the TPM Version?

 

tpm.msc lists Manufacturer information, including Specification Version, which should show 1.2 or 2.0.

Capture.thumb.PNG.b3b56470ae0333f63f3f6cb79a5d688e.PNG

Share this post


Link to post
15 hours ago, Martin Wienold said:

My PC at home doesn't have TPM available, I can't check.

My PC at work does and I used PowerShell with WMI to get the version


foreach($instance in Get-WmiObject -Namespace Root\CIMV2\Security\MicrosoftTpm -Class Win32_Tpm)
{
    $instance | Select-Object -Property * | Format-List
}

 

FYI - Found out that Get-WmiObject doesn't work with PS 7.x.  
This works, but you need to run in an elevated pwsh instance.

foreach($instance in Get-CIMInstance -Namespace Root\CIMV2\Security\MicrosoftTpm -Class Win32_Tpm)
{
     $instance | Select-Object -Property * | Format-List
}

and for me it returns

IsActivated_InitialValue    : True
IsEnabled_InitialValue      : True
IsOwned_InitialValue        : True
ManufacturerId              : 1398033696
ManufacturerIdTxt           : STM
ManufacturerVersion         : 73.4.17568.4452
ManufacturerVersionFull20   : 73.4.17568.4452
ManufacturerVersionInfo     :
PhysicalPresenceVersionInfo : 1.3
SpecVersion                 : 2.0, 0, 1.16
PSComputerName              :
CimClass                    : Root/CIMV2/Security/MicrosoftTpm:Win32_Tpm
CimInstanceProperties       : {IsActivated_InitialValue, IsEnabled_InitialValue, IsOwned_InitialValue, ManufacturerId…}
CimSystemProperties         : Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure.CimSystemProperties

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Seems it works 🙂

 

image.thumb.png.6c827d2f6153e699c2ca150008cc53c7.png

 

Funny thing is that I'm sure that the N45L CPU is not supported (plus there's no TPM in ESXi VMs) but the insider preview installed without complaints.

Share this post


Link to post
On 6/29/2021 at 4:21 AM, Vandrovnik said:

"If your PC doesn’t have a TPM capability then Windows 11 will be the falling rock which wipes out your beloved dinosaur hardware. "

Many motherboards, such as the Ryzen mobo I am using, have a header for an installable TPM 2.0 module. And as it's only about 18 months old, I would not characterize it as a dinosaur.

Share this post


Link to post
On 6/30/2021 at 2:12 AM, Nigel Thomas said:

tpm.msc lists Manufacturer information, including Specification Version, which should show 1.2 or 2.0.

Capture.thumb.PNG.b3b56470ae0333f63f3f6cb79a5d688e.PNG

This is an Intel firmware Trusted Platform Module in the PC BIOS, using Intel Platform Trust Technology built into many Intel processors. 

 

In my Asus BIOS, I  found PCH-FW Configuration, then Enable PTT, not very clear what PTT meant, so I never set it, they should spell out Trust to make it clearer.

 

Now WMI says:

 

Win32_Tpm, instance 1 of 1
IsActivated_InitialValue = True
IsEnabled_InitialValue = True
IsOwned_InitialValue = True
ManufacturerId = 1229870147
ManufacturerIdTxt = INTC
ManufacturerVersion = 500.14.0.0
ManufacturerVersionFull20 = 500.14.0.0
ManufacturerVersionInfo = Intel
PhysicalPresenceVersionInfo = 1.3

 

My older Asus PC says ManufacturerIdTxt = IFX which is Infineon Technologies AG who make the chip in most TPM modules. 

 

Angus

 

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, aehimself said:

Seems it works 🙂

Stupid question: Is it running inside a VM or directly on real hardware? When I installed it inside a Hyper-V machine, it lacked 3D acceleration and a lot of effects (transparency, animations, rounded corners) were missing.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×